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Caleb Gedemer

Unfrogettable — Greninja BREAK in Standard

You won't be forgetting about Greninja BREAK anytime soon, even after the rotation of Dive Ball in Standard. Find out why!

09/27/2017 by Caleb Gedemer

Introduction

Hi all, the season is back to full swing, and I’m pleased to say I’ve been playing as much as ever. I’ve been hitting League Cups each and every weekend, and brought home a trove of Top Eight finishes thus far. Approaching fast are another month of Regional Championships; October being the big month, and I plan on attending at least two of the three in the United States. The first of the three is going to be held in the Standard format, and for that, I’d like to go over one of the less-talked about decks circulating around out there: Greninja BREAK.

Dive Ball, Level Ball, and Repeat Ball’s rotation was said to be the death of Greninja, but contrary to that, I’ve been seeing the deck have a lot of success at League Cup events, and I think it’s something everyone should at least be aware of, if not playing themselves. With so many players writing it off, more decks than ever are taking losses to it, so when Greninja BREAK decks do pop their head out, things can get tricky for many of the top decks in the format.

Greninja BREAK figures to be a surprise play for many reasons, and it’s definitely on my radar as a potential deck choice for upcoming Standard format events. Going forward, it’s essential to have a strongly functioning deck list that can set up consistently, and from there, you’ll be in good shape to churn out wins. Let’s get going so I can share my deck list and prove to you that this deck’s got what it takes!

Overview

Set up, Giant Water Shuriken, Moonlight Slash, and so on… You know the drill, Greninja BREAK as a concept is nothing new, since the deck has literally been around for a couple years now. However, without some of its old “Ball” tools, the deck needs to be re-invented a bit, structure-wise. Brooklet Hill, Evosoda, Nest Ball, Timer Ball, and Ultra Ball are the only remaining realistic options for play in the deck, so weeding out the inferior cards and finding a balance between those that are solid is the next task on your platter.

For starters, four Ultra Ball should be an instant inclusion in any deck list. While it does come with the unfortunate repercussion of discarding two cards, Ultra Ball is the absolute best bang for your buck in this deck, and is a must. Now let’s begin to sift through some of the inferior options that need to be played because they’re all you’ve got…

Brooklet Hill is the first on the list, and it’s by far the best option aside from Ultra Ball. In fact, it was sometimes included in old lists, even when Dive Ball was around! It serves as an instant search for a Froakie, or other Water type Pokemon you might be playing, which accomplishes one of the first steps you’re looking to check off in the opening turns of the game.

Now let’s talk about Evosoda. I’ve used the card in the Expanded format before, way back when Archeops was still legal, and it was a means to maneuver around the Evolution lock. Aside from that, it was generally a worse version of Level Ball, but it did its job. In the Standard format, though, you don’t have access to Level Ball anymore, so you need to make due with what you’ve got, and Evosoda can get you the Evolution Pokemon you want into play. The only downside is that it can’t get a Froakie, but that’s not a huge deal in the grand scheme of things.

I also mentioned Nest Ball, which is likely the worst card option for this deck. Instead of it, if you were considering it, I would just run another Brooklet Hill, or two. Nest Ball’s use is limited just to Basic Pokemon, so that it doesn’t make it as useful as other options like Evosoda or Timer Ball, which I’ll cover next.

Timer Ball is the sketchiest option that you can play in this deck, but if you were to flip heads, it can be quite good. Again, I think Evosoda is just strictly better, and that said, we can begin to build a consistency skeleton composed of Brooklet Hill, Evosoda, and Ultra Ball. Maximizing counts of each of those cards is a good place to start, since focus on consistency will pay off when trying to set up your already (sometimes) inconsistent deck.

Now, with the loss of VS Seeker, there’s a debate about which consistency, or draw Supporter cards to use in this deck. Lillie, Skyla, and Sophocles are some of which are talked about alongside the more obvious max counts of N and Professor Sycamore. I really like Lillie and Skyla in this deck, equally, and recommend playing at least a single copy of each, for starters!

Before doing anything else, I recommend starting with a skeleton deck list like this:

Above I have included everything that I would for sure play in a Greninja BREAK deck, and for the final slots, I would either focus on adding cards to improve consistency, or focus on techs that could improve the deck in certain matchups. In the next few sections, I’ll cover my current favorite (complete) deck list, explain the cards, and talk about matchups. Let’s get right to it!

Deck List

Card Explanations

1 Tapu Lele-GX

Greninja BREAK decks of old were notorious for not playing Shaymin-EX, so why are they playing Tapu Lele-GX now? Consistency, that’s why! If you’re playing Ultra Ball already, which you are, then you may as well be playing at least one Tapu Lele-GX. Yes, sure, it may be a liability, but what’s even more of a danger is putting yourself in a position that you can’t draw out of, like having a dead hand, but having an Ultra Ball that you could play. I recommend that anyone playing Ultra Ball in Greninja BREAK should be playing at least one copy of this card.

4 Froakie

In any standard Evolution line, you’re typically going to want four of each lower Stage, like Froakie, in this case. I can see playing three, but I like the greater chance of drawing into it with more copies, and also, I enjoy being able to use Rare Candy on it, to turn into Greninja immediately. If you’re playing a deck without Rare Candy, then it does make a little sense to not commit four slots to this card, otherwise, stick with it, though!

4 Frogadier

If Prizing even a single Frogadier can make a game turn south, I wouldn’t recommend playing less than four!

4 Greninja

Again, same thing here as with Frogadier, Greninja is your main attacker, and playing four is integral to success!

3 Greninja BREAK

Less than three BREAK would be annoying if you Prized one, since you always want two in play so you have two potential Giant Water Shuriken Ability uses. Playing four would be too many, in my eyes, although it could have some merit. With Pokemon recovery cards like Rescue Stretcher and Super Rod, which I’ll talk about below, I think three Greninja BREAK is the perfect number.

1 Staryu

Without Staryu, you won’t be able to Evolve into Starmie! The Staryu from BREAKpoint with free Retreat is the best option, since you don’t want to have to waste an Energy attachment on it to just Retreat.

1 Starmie

Some lists opt to play a thicker line of this card, usually with two and two Staryu, but I’ve found just a single copy of each is sufficient. It provides just enough Energy recovery to make sure that you never stop using Giant Water Shuriken, and sometimes all you need is a Water Energy to keep things moving right along.

3 Evosoda

I think three spaces devoted to Pokemon search (outside of Ultra Ball) is fair. There is an argument for a fourth, or even a different card entirely on top of a fourth, but these spots should most certainly remain. I like three as a count for now.

3 Field Blower

The more copies of Field Blower you have, the easier it is to deal with Garbodor with Garbotoxin. While two seems too low, four seems like too many, especially in a deck that won’t be using them immediately, so three is a number that feels good, and that has been solid in testing. This is my preferred number as of now!

2 Rare Candy

Not every list has been using these, but I’m a big fan. Since this deck is a little more inconsistent post-rotation, Rare Candy is a nice option to have. If you have a Greninja in hand, with a Froakie on the bench, the only thing between you having that Greninja in play is a Rare Candy! It’s a combination that’s more often than not easier said than done, but when it works it’s awesome. Two gives you some leeway to discard one without using it, and still have the option to use one later in the game!

1 Rescue Stretcher

I think the perfect number for Pokemon recovery in this deck comes in twos. I have one Rescue Stretcher and one Super Rod, making up for that total of two recovery options. Rescue Stretcher is amazing because it can take a Pokemon straight from your discard pile and put it into your hand, and I’m sure you can think of some situations where that would be very useful. One is a nice number, and while two would be nice, I think the extra utility of Super Rod is worth playing, which I’ll cover next.

1 Super Rod

Retrieving Water Energy from your discard pile is nothing to scoff at, and that’s why I love having Super Rod alongside Rescue Stretcher. Sometimes, if you weren’t able to get Starmie into play, you may end up just an Energy or two away from winning the game! Don’t sleep on playing a single copy of this card.

4 Ultra Ball

For consistency, keep playing four Ultra Ball. It’s a fine way to search out Tapu Lele-GX, and is the best Pokemon searching card in the Standard format right now, so it’s a must if you’re trying to have as many ways to search your frogs out as you play the game.

3 Brooklet Hill

As I talked about earlier, Brooklet Hill is your primary way of searching out Basic Water Pokemon from your deck. With three, you have a better chance of drawing into it early, which can be crucial. Two is the bare minimum I’d play, and four could be a nice luxury, too. Three is what I recommend for now.

1 Fisherman

Without VS Seeker, this card might seem a little foolish. If you can keep it in your deck for the late game without having to discard it, though, you’ll have an instantaneous recovery of four Basic Water Energy, which can fuel some clutch Giant Water Shuriken uses. I really like this card as a backup if you’re not able to set up Starmie!

2 Lillie

Consistency is key, especially in an often-clunky deck like Greninja BREAK. Lillie might feel underwhelming sometimes, but when it draws a lot of cards, you’ll be wishing you never had bad thoughts about the card. In the late game, drawing into a Lillie from an N can be awesome, since it can often mean an instant refresh of six new cards. In the early game, provided you can play your hand down (which is something that Greninja BREAK can do quite well), you can get the same result. I like two, although larger counts could be solid as well.

4 N

Maxing out the count of the essential Supporter cards in any deck is a must, especially in this deck, so I wouldn’t go lower than this.

4 Professor Sycamore

Same logic here as with N!

2 Skyla

Skyla generally is a little more underwhelming than Lillie, but it can have its moments. When you only need a certain Trainer card, say, Field Blower, or Rare Candy, for instance, then you’ve got it! I don’t like Skyla sometimes because it’s usually only decent to play if you have another Supporter in your hand for your next turn, but like I said, when it works, it works. I really like having the option to pull crucial Trainer cards out of the deck, like Field Blower against a Garbotoxin lock from your opponent's Garbodor.

2 Choice Band

Choice Band is a must-have in any Greninja BREAK deck, since it can make you have a much stronger offensive pressure. Two is the number to start with, although there is merit to having a higher count, like three, for instance. As long as you play them down one at a time, they shouldn’t fall victim to Field Blower, and you should be sitting pretty. I like two, for now!

7 Water Energy

This is as high as I would go for Basic Energy in a Greninja BREAK deck, since even six can be alright. Having access to as many outs to Basic Energy for Giant Water Shuriken in your deck is an awesome resource, so I suggest keeping this count as it is.

3 Splash Energy

Splash Energy is amazing in the new Standard format for this deck, since it serves as a pseudo-consistency card. It’s obviously strong against N, too, since the Pokemon get returned to your hand before your opponent can shuffle them away! Playing four could even be a sweet option, but three is what I would start with, for sure.

Other Considerations

Alolan Vulpix

Beacon is very useful when playing a setup deck of any kind, especially Greninja BREAK! I’ve included it in some of my lists before, so I’m certainly a fan of the card in the deck. For no Energy cost at all, you can reap the benefits of what will hopefully become pieces of Evolutions that you’ll carry out on your next turn. I like it in a single count in this deck, if desired to be played.

Octillery

You can either play this as a replacement for Starmie, or alongside it. I personally like Starmie instead, since overall you generally just want Water Energy, and Octillery can be pretty underwhelming sometimes. If you can somehow find the space for both of them, that could prove to be super good; it might be something you want to try out!

Tapu Fini-GX

This card would give Greninja BREAK a GX attack, but that’s something I don’t think is necessary. Without Energy acceleration, its other attack is pretty hard to use, so it is basically an inclusion solely for the use of Tapu Storm GX. I can’t think of many situations where that is even useful, since against most decks you would rather just be inflicting damage anyways…

Guzma

Guzma can grant you the ability to use three Giant Water Shuriken drops in a turn, and also can help you target down a specific Pokemon. I think Greninja BREAK generally needs to focus on just drawing cards, so there aren’t usually many openings to use Guzma, especially if you chose to only play a single copy. It might just get discarded before you use it, so I’m not a big fan of it in the deck. If I found a way to have success with multiple copies, then maybe it could slip its way into one of my lists.

Timer Ball

If you believe in consistent odds, then Timer Ball presents a fairly good chance to flip at least one heads, which will result in one Evolution Pokemon. That’s essentially the same thing as Evosoda, but with some additional risk. Now, it does also wield the upside of two Evolution Pokemon, if you flip two heads, but I don’t like the tradeoff. If you were to not hit a single heads, then you’re in a really bad spot. I would prefer another copy of Evosoda instead of this in nearly any case, since it’s a guaranteed Evolution card.

Matchups

  • 1 Very Favorable
  • 3 Favorable
  • 0 Slightly Favorable
  • 2 Even
  • 0 Slightly Unfavorable
  • 2 Unfavorable
  • 0 Very Unfavorable

Gardevoir-GX | Favorable

As with any matchup, you’ll want to take your best crack at setting up thoroughly. Multiple Greninja in play is going to be very difficult for your opponent to deal with, so once you get to that point, it should be smooth sailing. The biggest threat to worry about in this matchup is Gallade. Its Sensitive Blade can take one-hit Knockouts on Greninja, but not the BREAK, which can cause you some serious problems when trying to set up. To avoid letting Gallade have its way, I suggest using Froakie’s Bubble for as long as possible, or putting up Pokemon to sacrifice.

Once you’re all set up, you can just use your Greninja BREAK’s Giant Water Shuriken to take easy Knockouts, even on the Gallade. Once that hurdle has been jumped, you should be on a good track to winning. Don’t underrate Bubble, it’s the attack you should be using most when you’re still trying to set up. While you won’t always flip heads, the times that you do should buy you more and more time, and allow you to get all the things that you want online.

The only way that this matchup can become unfavorable is if your opponent decides to play a Giratina with Devour Light. You won’t be able to use Giant Water Shuriken anymore, and that being said, most of your offensive life will be sapped. The most you can possibly do with an attack is 110 with Moonlight Slash, as long as you have a Choice Band attached to your attacking Greninja, and that won’t even be good enough for a two-shot, you’ll have to attack three times against a Gardevoir-GX to finally take a Knockout. In that time, your opponent will be able to lay down tons of Energy to their Gardevoir-GX, and blow up whatever you decide to use. Hope that your opponent isn’t using Giratina, because you’ll be in good shape if they’re not!

Garbodor / Drampa-GX | Even

Drampa-GX can be a problem as soon as your opponent’s second turn with its Berserk attack, but once you get out your Greninja BREAK, they will be impossible to take a one-hit Knockout on, unless your opponent has a Professor Kukui in combination with a Berserk attack for 170 damage. Handling Garbodor with Garbotoxin is your next order of business, and you should focus on conserving your Field Blowers until late game when you can use them on the same turn as a Giant Water Shuriken.

Obviously, be mindful of the number of Items that you play when playing this matchup, you want to avoid going over eight, because anything over that will be one-hit Knockout range for Garbodor’s Trashalanche attack. When you can actually use your Abilities, you can trade very well against your opponent, since you can take easy Knockouts on Drampa-GX, and also on Garbodor, as long as you have access to Giant Water Shuriken.

It shouldn’t matter too often, but remember that Splash Energy can be discarded by Drampa-GX’s Righteous Edge. This said, don’t leave Splash Energy attached to your Pokemon if you think your opponent is considering using the attack. Especially noteworthy is that a Righteous Edge followed by a Berserk is 170 damage total, enough for a Knockout on a Greninja BREAK. Likewise, that can be done in reverse order, but the same logic applies. This matchup is super close, so be sure to save your Field Blower cards until the turns you want to use Giant Water Shuriken, and be careful when playing Items!

Garbodor / Golisopod-GX | Unfavorable

Grass type, and Ability lock? Not much else could be worse than this matchup. If your opponent can effectively cycle through Golisopod-GX, you won’t be able to put up much of a fight at all. Armor Press is especially effective once your opponent can get it online too. Your best bet is to just go through the motions as always, and don’t let your opponent’s type advantage tilt you. Garbodor’s Garbotoxin is the true problem in the later game, since you can still take Knockouts on Golisopod-GX if it’s not online and stopping your Giant Water Shuriken Abilities.

Acerola is another problem card that your opponent can play down, so using N often to disrupt your opponent’s hand to make sure that he or she isn’t sitting on an Acerola is wise. The more you N, the more likely that your opponent will miss a Knockout, especially in the late game. As annoying as it is, if your opponent is playing Garbodor with Trashalanche, you’ll need to play around that, too.

Field Blower, as with any Garbodor matchup, is super important, no matter what the circumstance is. Holding onto them and using them in conjunction with Giant Water Shuriken is a good idea. I wish there was more than could be done to improve this matchup, but really, there isn’t. You’ll need your opponent to miss some Knockouts, and you’ll need to piece together some big damaging turns to take Knockouts on your opponent’s hefty 210 HP Golisopod-GX.

Greninja BREAK | Even

The mirror match is an excruciating grind, but at least it’s not as bad as it used to be with Rough Seas in both player’s decks. Now, if you were to play Max Potion, then you’ll be the one with the advantage. Most lists aren’t playing that card right now, though, so you’ll need to focus on Retreating between your Greninja to avoid getting knocked out. To start, you’ll need to use Shadow Stitching. Whoever does it first usually has the advantage. This is all because you cannot afford your opponent to use Giant Water Shuriken, since it would decimate your field of Pokemon.

Some lists in the past have played Pokemon Ranger to improve this matchup for you, but without VS Seeker, I don’t think that’s a very worthwhile inclusion anymore. Your best bet is to set up four Greninja, along with the BREAK on three of them, and constantly Retreat between them, all the while using Shadow Stitching. N will be big, too, so that you can avoid running out of cards, as can Splash Energy, because it can keep more cards in your deck since you get the whole Greninja line back after a Knockout.

There isn’t much more to this matchup, since it’s so linear. Never pass up on using Shadow Stitching, since the moment you break the lock, your opponent will go crazy with Giant Water Shuriken and likely take multiple Prizes off your Pokemon. The most practical card to gaining an advantage in this matchup would certainly be to play a Max Potion or two. If you don’t play it, though, you better hope your opponent doesn’t. Try to play this match as fast as possible, since it’s going to be a long one, with not many Prizes taken from you and your opponent.

The mirror match is an excruciating grind, but at least it’s not as bad as it used to be with Rough Seas in both player’s decks. Now, if you were to play Max Potion, then you’ll be the one with the advantage. Most lists aren’t playing that card right now, though, so you’ll need to focus on Retreating between your Greninja to avoid getting knocked out. To start, you’ll need to use Shadow Stitching. Whoever does it first usually has the advantage. This is all because you cannot afford your opponent to use Giant Water Shuriken, since it would decimate your field of Pokemon.

Some lists in the past have played Pokemon Ranger to improve this matchup for you, but without VS Seeker, I don’t think that’s a very worthwhile inclusion anymore. Your best bet is to set up four Greninja, along with the BREAK on three of them, and constantly Retreat between them, all the while using Shadow Stitching. N will be big, too, so that you can avoid running out of cards, as can Splash Energy, because it can keep more cards in your deck since you get the whole Greninja line back after a Knockout.

There isn’t much more to this matchup, since it’s so linear. Never pass up on using Shadow Stitching, since the moment you break the lock, your opponent will go crazy with Giant Water Shuriken and likely take multiple Prizes off your Pokemon. The most practical card to gaining an advantage in this matchup would certainly be to play a Max Potion or two. If you don’t play it, though, you better hope your opponent doesn’t. Try to play this match as fast as possible, since it’s going to be a long one, with not many Prizes taken from you and your opponent.

Ho-Oh-GX / Salazzle-GX | Favorable

If your opponent is using a Giratina with Devour Light, which some lists have been, then this matchup gets a whole lot worse. However, let’s assume they aren’t… While Ho-Oh-GX does have a ton of HP, its two Prize bounty is a huge advantage for you. If you opponent misplays and puts any Pokemon that have a Weakness to Water on his or her Bench, then you’ll immediately take control of the game, since you can take an easy Knockout on that Pokemon. Your opponent is bound to take an early lead on Prizes, since Ho-Oh-GX can begin attacking as early as the second turn with assistance from Kiawe, but you’ll be poised for a powerful comeback.

Greninja BREAK is always strong against Pokemon-EX/GX, since it can get ahead in the Prize race. Even if your opponent can put Fighting Fury Belt on his or her Pokemon, you have plenty of Field Blower to remove that Tool and get the Prizes you rightfully deserve.

As mentioned, Giratina makes this a lot harder, since you won’t be able to take Knockouts as easily. If only Ho-Oh-GX had Weakness to Water… then you would own this matchup like you normally do with Water-weak Fire decks. If your opponent isn’t playing Giratina, and you’ll able to get multiple Greninja BREAK going, you should win this matchup.

Metagross-GX | Very Favorable

Even if your opponent is playing Magearna-EX, this matchup is pretty much an automatic win. Shadow Stitching shuts your opponent down, it shuts him or her down bad! Metagross-GX is probably the most Ability-reliant deck in the format, and without a way to get around your Ability lock, your opponent will have no choice but to just pass, or Retreat a Metagross-GX to the Bench, all the while losing all the Energy that were on it. Your opponent might not even get the opportunity to attack, since with Geotech System being so integral to a Metagross-GX deck, your opponent will have to manually attach Energy to use his or her attacks, rather than using the normal Ability-based route of Geotech System.

Giant Water Shuriken drops make it even harder for your opponent, and even if he or she plays a Giratina, then the Ability lock will be what ultimately gets him or her. The damage from Giant Water Shuriken is not even close to the source of the problem, it’s completely attributed to the Ability lock from Shadow Stitching.

The only way that a Metagross-GX player can really get around it is with a Pokemon Ranger, relieving your opponent from the effects of attacks, but that is a super uncommon inclusion in a Metagross-GX deck, so I wouldn’t expect your opponent to be playing it. Additionally, he or she could have a fully powered up Metagross-GX, but not have a way to Retreat and get the Energy back on, so instead, he or she could play a Guzma, switch to the Bench, and then Retreat a Pokemon with a single Retreat cost like Beldum, and then promote the Metagross-GX back up to the Active spot and attack again. Generally speaking, though, the game is over the second you announce “Shadow Stitching”.

Vikavolt / Tapu Bulu-GX | Unfavorable

Normally, you might think that since this is an Ability-based deck, that you might have the advantage. While that’s the case with a Metagross-GX deck, Vikavolt is an entirely different animal. Tapu Bulu-GX can easily take one-hit Knockouts on any of your Pokemon, and it can even leave all of its energy attached, too! Worse yet, is that Tapu Wilderness GX can completely heal it, completely undoing any work you had done to whittle its health down. If your opponent manages to get a Vikavolt down quickly, like on the second or third turn, it’s likely that you wouldn't have used Shadow Stitching by then, and then your opponent will be free to use Strong Charge and power up Tapu Bulu-GX.

One Tapu Bulu-GX can be manageable, but after that, if your opponent is able to get two down with the necessarily Energy to attack, things will get tricky. In those situations, Giant Water Shuriken will be more important than ever, since you’ll be relying on it to take down a threat that’s already set up, with no way to be downsized.

If you’re attacking, you need to be using Shadow Stitching. If you can use that attack and also take a Knockout, leaving your opponent with no powered up Tapu Bulu-GX in play, then you might be able to pull off what would normally be an extremely improbable win. As long as your opponent isn’t attacking, then you should be able to knock out a Tapu Bulu-GX every turn with Giant Water Shuriken drops, eliminating any potential threats that could threaten your potential to pull off a bid at an upset.

Volcanion | Favorable

Lastly, I would like to touch on a matchup that is almost as easy as the Metagross-GX matchup. Volcanion, unlike Ho-Oh-GX, has a Weakness to Water Pokemon, and Greninja BREAK can roll it over. With a Choice Band, you do 220 damage to a water-weak Pokemon, like Volcanion-EX. Even if it does have a Fighting Fury Belt attached, you can still hit the necessary number for a Knockout. The only foreseeable problem is if your opponent is running a Ho-Oh-GX, or two, and with it, he or she can avoid the Weakness problem, and put you in some more difficult situations.

Again, though, your opponent’s deck still is composed of attackers that tend to be strictly Pokemon-EX/GX, the relevant ones, at least, and that being said, you can win the Prize trade with ease.

Shadow Stitching is a viable option in this matchup if you’re worried about your opponent taking Knockouts with Volcanion-EX and its Volcanic Heat, but going for the one-hit Knockout route with Moonlight Slash is generally better. This matchup is super good, so hopefully you can play against many of them at upcoming events if you choose to play Greninja BREAK!

Talonflame with Greninja BREAK

I didn’t mention this on the “Other Considerations” section, because I think it deserves classification as a different deck entirely! Talonflame’s Aero Blitz is very powerful indeed, and has some merit in Standard since it can help you set up a little easier. The only downside is that your opponent can control whether or not you actually get to keep the cards you choose by playing an N, and also, Talonflame takes up a lot of the slots in your deck, and if you don’t start it, that’s a lot of dead, wasted space. It’s an option to certainly consider though, and here’s a list to get you started in case you want to test it out for yourself…

Playing Through Type Advantage Tilt

This is a facade that I’d like to try my best at breaking down in this section. Imagine yourself sitting down with Greninja BREAK, and you know you’re paired with a Grass type deck. You know the matchup, and you expect to lose. While you may be at super unlikely odds to pull off a victory, you should never let that dark feeling of dread overcome you that you might experience when your opponent originally flips over a Grass type Pokemon. Just try your best to go through the motions of your deck as you would in any other matchup, and look for openings that you can use to your advantage! Bad matchups are all over, and type advantage is the culprit in many of them, so don’t let it get to you.

Conclusion

That’s all I have for today everyone! Greninja BREAK is a solid choice in the Standard format, and one that’s very fitting for specialized metagames. If you know what the field is going to look like at an upcoming League Cup event, don’t be afraid to pick up the deck and try it if the opportunity looks right. Thanks for stopping by and reading, everyone, be sure to check out my Facebook page and give it a like. Catch you later, Trainers!

[+10] okko


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